Sunday, January 31, 2016

Song #9

I was going to try an abstract song yesterday but I got a bunch of flowers that called out to be painted so I could not resist their call.
I worked on them three times.  The first pretty much the way I would approach any painting.  The second paying more attention to each stroke of the stylus and the third drawing with white first to see how that would go.
SONG # 9

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Song #8


Yesterday I made two versions of the original Barnes Foundation which I glimpsed through the gate on my walk.  As you can see I have gotten away from trying to create colors in time...but not for long.  In the second piece I tried to make each stroke interesting as I might in the abstract colors in time.  This is harder to do when you have a preconceived image in mind.  Today I will go back to looking for a pattern in time in color alone.
Song #8




Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Song #7

Today's "song" is just plain corny.  When I got up yesterday morning and looked out the window the whole sky was lit up as the sun came into view and the reflections on the snow were spectacular.  You've seen this kind of scene portrayed ad nauseum but I decided to do it anyway.  You don't hear people talking about stuff that is "corny" much anymore but here is the definition and derivation in case you are interested. https://www.quora.com/How-did-the-term-corny-develop
  I find that simply starting out with nothing in mind and working away at trying to create something is much more fun than having something in mind and going for it.  There is the joy of figuring out how to do what you have in mind but not the same kind of excitement or spontaneity as reacting on a moment to moment basis to what is happening.  This one was planned...but not too well as I didn't use layers as well as I could have. I may do it again with better planning.
Here it is SONG #7.

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

SONG #6

Here is Song #6 in my attempt to make a song a day in Procreate as I find out all the things I can do.  Here I tried the water color brush.

Song #6

Saturday, January 23, 2016

Blizzard Fun



"Oh, the weather outside is frightful
But the fire is so delightful
And since we’ve no place to go
Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow"

Since I have no children at home to build a snowman I decided to go back to my own childhood when I would spend hours making pictures of kids having fun with my trusty box of Crayolas.
I used the crayon brush in Procreate which is a little heavy handed but still had lots of fun with this one. I will try again tomorrow. Music is by Kevin MacLeod.


Blizzard 2016



Thursday, January 21, 2016

Song # 5

Time for a little Gershwin, I got Rhythm!  I am finding that by repeating actions I can create visual rhythm that connects with the music even though the actions are created completely separate from the music and the music is added after the fact. what do you think?

Song #5

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Song #4

Today's song is a pattern of sorts.  I thought I would find some indian drumming to go along with it but was unable to come up with any free drumming.   I did find this piece that definitely got the feeling for me.  Hope you like it.

Song #4

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Songs

1. Song #3
2. Direct translation of music to color

Yesterday I neglected to say that the second piece, (Direct translations of music to color) because it is really formed by music, has a distinct rhythm and color scheme.  The first piece is more like dance. It moves in time to the music vaguely but does not have a rhymic structure of its own.
I have for many years been attempting to find a way to have colors move in time and move the emotions in the way music does.  So for me these distinctions are very important.

Saturday, January 16, 2016

song #3

Continuing my song a day, here is yesterday's stab at some sort or colors ordered in time.  There are lots of problems with this idea.  First it is impossible to control the timing of anything.  Spaces are not recorded, so if you put down a mark it is recorded and it doesn't matter how long it takes you to make the mark is still rushes on willy nilly.  Second everything is cumulative so there is a lot on top of other stuff.  These are just problems that can be solved probably.  Is it worth it?  We'll see.  Here are two versions of the same piece of music.  Dilebes' Flower Duet from Lacme.  The first is the Procreate version and the second is my translation of music to color animated in Flash.  If my Flash program were still working I would go back to using that.  When I got a new computer it went kaput.  That is also a problem that can be solved probably.  It's one on my list.

1. Song #3
2. Direct translation of music to color

For more color music translations type in my name in youtube and you will get my channel.   Lots more to see there if you are interested.







Friday, January 15, 2016

Song #2

In the spirit of a painting a day I'm going to post my Procreate paintings in time each day. They are stabs in the dark as I cannot control the timing at all and barely know how to use the brushes but it should get better as time goes on.
Here is song #2.

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Song #1

I just got a new app for my iPad.  I thought I might like to try to create a still life for today.  While playing with lots of the options I found that it automatically recorded what I was doing and I could play it back.  Now this opens up a whole other realm of possibilities.  Here is one of my first attempts to create something that is unique to this new media option.  (Actually I have no idea what anyone else is doing with this app but it is certainly new for me)  I'll check into that and let you know.  I added the music by going through my iTunes library and looking for something sprightly that was about the length of the piece.  I don't think this is a way to make unique still lifes but it may be a way to create some color in time that is fun to watch.
Here is a link to song #1:

Friday, January 8, 2016

January Newsletter

Is there still life in still life?

The show at the Philadelphia Museum of Art does not set out to ask that question but, if we are to believe what we see there, the answer I’m afraid would be no.  

Audubon is the first painter represented, an ironic choice, as his paintings are not what one would usually consider to be still life, but paintings of animals and birds pictured in action.  They were  painted while stuffed so were actually quite dead.  I guess that’s where the “still” comes in.  They are beautiful works so who can complain.  The rest of the next several rooms of the exhibit are filled with ravishingly beautiful paintings of fruit, vegetables and flowers with the occasional human holding them.   There is an especially luscious painting of a woman slicing an onion amidst an array of vegetables whose eye is just about to spill a beautifully painted tear.  Ah the detail, the loving caress of paintbrush here and delicate application of light there.  These are paintings to die for.  If you owned one you would never tire of taking it in.

I loved the delicacy of the lighting and the way the compositions were carefully put together.  These are not real fruit, or flowers, they are an ideal feeling of fruit and flowers caught in their most perfect form forever.  Here are some clips from the Museum’s web site.




Slowly at first things change as one moves forward in time to the next rooms.  Flowers and fruit change into violins, guns, and once again dead animals.  This time they are not posed as live as in Audubon but really dead and in 3D.   Trump 'oil takes over…and the the flowers that remain are getting flatter and flatter.  Subtle light disappears and is exchanged for a certain sameness of tone.  What happened to the mysterious darks I wonder and crisp highlights?

Suddenly we are confronted with a room full of paintings whose relationship to the ripeness and sensuousness of the older paintings is gone.  Although in the past I would have said I enjoyed Georgia Okeefe’s Lillies I found them rather disappointing after so much careful attention to sensuous detail and light.  In this room only the painting of Grant Wood’s mother and the water color of Demuth held up for me.  The rest were worth a glance and out the door. Warhol’s Brillo boxes?  No life there folks, just a chuckle.

But it did not have to be that way.  I see the intent of the curators.  Art does change and taste for art changes but what is considered “art” by the art critics and taste makers may not be what is actually happening in the world of “seeing” and art making.  There are exciting still life paintings from the 20th century.  They were not however represented in this show.  Here are a few possible inclusions that would have rounded things out nicely for me.  This is a very small sample assembled in an afternoon.  Imagine what else is out there.


Iris and Fruit
N.C. Wyeth


EGGS
      John Hammell


STILL LIFE WITH REFLECTION
Caroline Bays


CAKES 
Wayne Tiebald


STILL LIFE WITH SUN 
(this lovely painting by Philadelphia native Elizabeth Osborne is actually in the museum collection but not in this show)


PAPAYA AND WATER GLASS
Bill Sharp


SILK THREAD
Sydney Bella Sparrow


TULIPS
David Hockney


From the 21st century several times a week I get lovely small works in my email from people who are still concentrating on an arrangement of items and examining them carefully to create a lasting image in paint. These works are notable as beautiful art, because they are for the most part sold on line not through galleries.  Is this the wave of the future?   Their small size also makes them affordable for the average person!!! 
Imagine that.
The first from the founder of the movement “a painting a day”, 




EGGS
Duane Keiser



PEAR IN LATE AFTERNOON SUN
Barbara Kaciacek


LIGHT BULB
Daniel Jackson

and last but by no means least our local talent Abbey Ryan whose work could be from the last century with its careful observation of texture, color and light.



PURPLE PLUMS
Abbey Ryan

This show really got me thinking about what I am doing and reawakened my respect and delight in seeing what is really there.  Take your eyes to the Museum, leave the head phones on the rack and see what you think before it is too late.  I recommend taking your reading glasses and getting up close.  You only have 2 days to go!

Thanks for reading.  Let me know if you have any fabulous finds in still life to add to this so incomplete list.

Sunday, January 3, 2016

DECEMBER 2015

It has been a very strange December.  No cold weather to speak of and no snow.  This has left me feeling a bit confused. I don't like cold weather but without it things just seem wrong.  The leaves are gone and the days are short but by the end of December there were plum trees in bloom and lily leaves starting to come up.  What next?

At the same time I have been experimenting with new types of painting support.  I am using a very hard flat surface called gesso panel.  Unlike canvas which absorbs some paint and has a semi rough texture this support is flat and hard.  I wanted to see if I could build the paint up a bit, creating texture with the brush as it left ridges while using a lot of paint.  In order to create areas that were defined I simplified the drawing so that each shape was discrete.

I wanted the color to say something without too much reference to the "scene".  So far the results have been mixed.  My latest painting somehow turned out quite different from what I planned and I am beginning to loose interest in this approach.

I am including my reference photo - the one I planned very carefully on the computer- and the finished work to show how things went wrong.  I'm not sure how I got so far away from the colors I had  planned as the combination of color is what I was interested in.  The feeling of the colors in the plan is quite different from the feeling of the colors in the final painting.  I wonder what happened.  It is the feeling of the colors in the plan that I was after.  That is how I feel about this December.   I am going to print it out on soft archival paper with archival ink.   I suspect my natural cheery nature took over and I simply needed to paint some bright color.


December 2015 plan



December 2015
9" x 12"
oil on gesso panel


Saturday, December 26, 2015

Two Dogs in the Morning Light

Christmas is over.  The family are all back to their own homes.  Jake and Bay miss their doggy friends and all the food that is spilled on a holiday.  The house is quiet again. 


Two Dogs in the Morning Light
Nancy Herman
9" x 12"
oil on Gesso Panel

$250.00




Friday, December 18, 2015

CONNECTIONS



At this time of the year we gather together with family and friends to celebrate the end of another year.  We feel connected by traditions to each other and to the years that have gone by.   To me the faces found in the computer seem to be saying something about these connections.  When one person is afraid their energy is transmitted to others.  When someone smiles it lights up others.  We are closer than we think.
https://youtu.be/b3wBfymtUuA

Friday, December 4, 2015

Shabu Shabu

Winter is here, there's a chill in the air, the days are short and it's time to huddle together to keep the body and soul warm.  Here is a recipe for my family's version of Shabu Shabu the Japanese dish that is a great way to have a big party dinner and celebrate being together.

Here is a 2 minute video to get you in the party mood.  Every time I use Final Cut Pro I learn some new tricks.  In this one I tried to use as many transitions as possible, pretty much willy nilly as the whole thing is just for fun. I took the videos and stills with my phone as I was waiting for my selections to cook.

As you can see there is a lot of milling around necessary when eating this dinner, that's one of the things that make it a friendly affair.

It really is a matter of shop and chop as the cooking is done by your guests.
First you need one or two hot pots that plug into the wall and keep broth boiling at the table.  Next you must go to an Asian market with as many people as you can for more fun and suggestions - have lunch there if you can.  If you live in the Philadelphia area I recommend the Asian market at 69th Street for an interesting experience.  You will see lots of food you don't find at the chain super markets. I usually go with my dear Daughter in Law, Martina, who suggested this meal in the first place and knows what she is doing.

Buy greens of all sorts, chinese cabbage, spinach, bok choy, scallions, fresh garlic, ginger and cilantro and whatever else looks good.  Mushrooms of all sorts are a must and a nice variety of noodles - the fat ones take a long time to cook, so don't get too many of those.  Then on to the meat and fish department.  They often have frozen or fresh meat sliced thin which is perfect or if you don't like meat get some cod, halibut or salmon or any similarly textured fish.  There are also dumplings in the freezer you might like to include.
Next in the grocery area get Korean Barbecue Sauce - hot and not, soy sauce, chili sauce and fish sauce.  Don't forget some firm tofu for the vegetarians.

Now on to the chopping, again get as many people involved as possible as there is a lot to do, but the good news is you can really do it all yourself if you have to, and it won't take more than 45 minutes.

First put a big pot of water on the stove and as you are chopping put all the parts you don't use (ends of cabbage, little knobs of ginger, onion discards etc)  into the pot to make a starting broth.

Chop garlic, ginger, cilantro and scallions and put them each in separate bowls for the table. Then get to work on the vegetables.  They should be in bite size pieces. Same with meat, fish and tofu although if you get the meat sliced very thin it is ready to go.  If the fish is frozen it doesn't fall apart when you cut it.

About 15 minutes before you want to sit down to dinner turn on the hot pots and put the boiling broth into them.  Put all the things you have chopped in bowls on the table and get people set to eat.  I suggest you seat those who like meat at one end of the table and the fish and tofu guys at the other to keep the hot pots just right for each.
What is really great about this meal is that you get to cook what you want.

Each person starts by putting a nice selection of what they like into the bottom of their bowl.  Chopped garlic, fresh ginger, scallions, and cilantro are a good start with soy sauce, hot sauce, Korean barbecue or fish sauce.  (I am allergic to MSG, so if you are, only use soy sauce and plain hot sauce.  It is still delicious.) Everyone puts some vegetables and protein into the hot pot and in a very few minutes each dinner is served by scooping out the cooked food and putting it into your bowl.  Usually several people put stuff in and share the result.  You continue putting things in and taking things out, adding boiling water from time to time when the broth gets low.  If you have lots of broth of course you can add that but as things go along the broth in the pot gets very flavorful and adding water is okay.

That's it.  Good luck and if you try it please let me know how it all turns out.




Wednesday, December 2, 2015

AUTUMN 2015


AUTUMN 2015
Nancy Herman
20" x 24"
oil on canvas

I have not been posting lately as I have been working on this larger canvas.  Autumn to me is the season of emotional ups and downs.  The trees and foliage are breathtakingly beautiful but you know it is all going to end in the bare grey and tans of icy cold of winter.  No more sitting on the porch watching the sun go down before dinner.  The sun is down before you are finished work.  The light is dramatic when it is out but it all points to only one thing..the end of nature for the year.  In this canvas I have tried to capture all these feelings.  It is a further step in the new direction my painting seems to be heading.  What do you think?

$1500.00


Saturday, November 28, 2015

Sincerely Yours

Hope you had a delicious fun Thanksgiving.
 
The holidays remind me of the old days when friends were far away and we used letters to keep in touch.  Now a quick line in email or text takes their place.  But there was something about getting those well thought out words in script that was quite wonderful.  Here is my tribute to the personal letter.  As you may know I have a romance with the postage stamp and over the years I have amassed quite a collection from strangers and friends.  We take for granted this very small art form representing our heros, villains, occasions and simply the joy of nature often done in fine lithography.   Here is my tribute to the personal letter created in postage stamps and cancellation marks.

SINCERELY YOURS
13" x 19"
Nancy Herman
archival digital print of a collage of postage stamps

$150.00




Tuesday, November 17, 2015

AUTUMN 2015

Since I have been sending out a monthly newsletter I have been giving the news more thought.  Why is it that the news consists of disastrous things that happen in the world?  Every day wonderful things happen as well.  These stories are usually presented as "human interest" if at all.
I am taking a personal stand for good news starting today.  This fall was a real stunner.  Autumn in the Northeast is always nature's inadvertent gift to humanity before the grey of winter sets in, but this year the combination of lots of rain in the spring and warmer weather in the fall left us with color that was spectacular and long lasting.  Even now as I look out my window the sun is lighting up the brilliant red of the trees in my yard.
So here is a short story hot off the presses.

PENNSYLVANIA HAS RECORD BREAKING BEAUTY IN FALL MONTHS!
Watch video for on the spot reporting!

https://youtu.be/bFWTUzlyjcs

The opening shots are from my yard featuring my two Katsura trees, which not only turn a brilliant yellow, but smell like burnt sugar in the fall.  The remaining footage is from Chanticleer gardens.


Monday, November 16, 2015

RED TREE AND YELLOW WALL


RED TREE AND YELLOW WALL
Nancy Herman
12" x 12"
oil on stretched canvas

I have been somewhat besotted this year with the autumn colors. This is a scene from somewhere in Chestnut Hill.  I wanted to paint it to express that wonderful feeling of surprise when you come upon an especially luscious tree in the fall.

This image does not display the texture of the painting.  My scanner is broken and after several months of using masking tape to hold it together I think it has finally given up.  Anyone have a good scanner they can recommend?

$500.00




Tuesday, November 10, 2015

FADING AWAY


FADING AWAY
Nancy Herman
12" x 9"
oil on canvas board

On a recent trip to New York on the train I caught this old house on my camera as we sat in Amtrak comfort whizzing by.  I will add it to my "From the Train" series.  You can see the series by going to my web site www.nancyherman.com, then to "paintings" and then to "From the Train".

What is it about properties that are falling apart that is so fascinating?  Certainly for me part of the interest is in speculating about what is happening inside...are people still living there or has it been taken over by rodents and insects?  What is the ladder doing on the roof?  I also am fascinated by what happens over time to structures once lovingly made by humans.  How long will it take for nature to completely destroy this structure?  As the paint peels and weathers, the doors fall away, vines climb in and out of the windows and graffiti does its own climbing, the house does in its way become more and more beautiful, reassembling an abstract painting.

$250.00


Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Thursday, October 29, 2015

TABLE FOR ONE


TABLE FOR ONE
Nancy Herman
9" x 12"
oil on canvas board

Eating alone in a restaurant can feel awkward and lonely, while eating alone at home is just fine, especially with a good book to keep you company.  But how does eating alone in a restaurant feel when you are the only one there?  What do you think?

Giving the series 21st Century Artifacts a rest while I dive back into life outside the computer.  I have the collection of Faces so far on my website.  Go to "paintings" and then scroll down to FACES if you are interested.  http://nancyherman.com

Monday, October 26, 2015

WHOSE ON TOP


WHOSE ON TOP
Nancy Herman
8" x 16"
oil on canvas board

Here is the latest in the series 20th Century Artifacts.  These computer seers are very versatile, turned upside down the triangle between the face appears to be a face.  These all seem quite pleased with themselves.  They should be, as I had to use very small brushes to give them life.


Thursday, October 8, 2015

MARDI GRAS


MARDI GRAS
16" x 8"
Nancy Herman
oil on canvas board

Next in the series 21st Century Artifacts, Mardi Gras, these faces are warning of something.  I guess Mardi Gras can never be quite the same after Katrina.

Monday, October 5, 2015

WHISPER DOWN THE LANE


WHISPER DOWN THE LANE
Nancy Herman
8" x 16"
oil on canvas board

Why am I, an artist who has spent hours painting nature outside and in the studio now painting images actually created by the computer?

 Since I spent the majority of my life with not even an idea of using the computer to help me create or communicate, my sensibilities were not influenced by the digital world at all during their formative years.  I have followed my bliss as Joseph Campbell recommended from one discipline to another, painting outside from nature, painting translations of music, making fabric wall hangings, collages of stamps and in recent years making videos on the computer.  For me the computer is a tool to help realize what my imagination wants to produce.  With these faces found in the computer however I am surrendering to the digital world.  Willingly giving myself up to whatever these faces want to tell me.

 For all my working life I have wondered what art really is.  Inspired by great works and disgusted by trivial gimmicks I have always tried to find the answer to that question.  Now I see that a computer can randomly spew out images that actually tell a story.  What is that about?  If I had not "seen" the "story" it would not exist and if I had not selected the colors to illustrate the story and carefully transformed it in paint it would not exist for others to see.  Is the artist, like the concert pianist just performing from a score they have composed? When the score is "nature' their performance is confined by that.  When it is abstract are they performing without a "score"?  There is a great deal of speculation about how the digital age is changing how we relate to each other and how we learn.  While I paint these faces I ponder some of these questions as they continue to whisper their digital messages.


Saturday, October 3, 2015

OO LA LA


OO LA LA
Nancy Herman
Oil on Canvas Board

If the colors look familiar in this piece it's because this is FATIMA AND THE COYBOYS turned upside down.  Interesting these 21st Century artifacts have many sides to their stories.

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Fatima and the Cowboys

Here is the second in the series 21st Century Artifacts, FATIMA AND THE COWBOYS.


FATIMA AND THE COWBOYS
Nancy Herman
16" x 8"
oil on canvas board

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Fleeing Terror

One day, after applying several filters to some stripes while playing in Photoshop, I was surprised to find faces peering out at me.  I found these faces quite arresting as they were all connected and formed a pattern even though they were each a little different, much like humans.   After playing some more I found that it was possible to 'find' faces using other shapes and the results were, to my mind quite interesting.  I would go so far as to say I felt they were trying to tell me something.  This sounds a bit crazy I know and so I turned my experience into a children's book - JOE AND THE ADOBIANS - because children are allowed to have crazy ideas as they can be assumed to grow out of them.

Now after a year or so has gone by I still am interested in these faces and have decided to paint a series of them.  Crazy or not these computer people have something to say and I'm going to let them say it.
(If you went to the link for JOE...the voice on the promo is my grandson Luke Herrine.)

Here is the first one.  I am calling this series 21ST CENTURY ARTIFACTS.


FLEEING TERROR
Nancy Herman
8" x 16"
oil on canvas board

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

City Scape

I have two paintings in the Show at the Wayne Art Center presently.  In these work I have been concentrating on simplifying shapes and color to get the essence of what I want to say.


CAUGHT ON THE CORNER
Nancy Herman
9" x 12"
oil on canvas board


CAUGHT CROSSING
Nancy Herman
18" x 24"
oil on canvas board

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Altoon Sultan

Here is another of my favorite bloggers, Altoon Sultan.  She blogs about her paintings, the nature on her farm and her favorite places.  I enjoy her thoughtful writing and her interesting work.

Friday, September 4, 2015

September Newsletter

No art shows to report in August, but September began with a bang Wednesday as I traveled to the Metropolitan Museum in New York  with two friends to see China, Through the Looking Glass.  This show closes on Sunday, so if you are anywhere near Manhattan I highly recommend it.  It is a multi media extravaganza filled with ravishing costumes and art.

As soon as our little group emerged from the elevator into Gallery 980, we were in a dark room with black shiny walls and red lights.  Some of the more spectacular scenes from Bertolucci’s The Last Emperor were showing on huge movie screens and Sakamoto's score for the movie, Open the Door, played throughout the space.  We were suddenly enveloped in a dream world, and like dreams we lost our ’selves’ to the magic of the experience.  The references to Alice in Wonderland were quite apt as the sensation of falling into another time and place was thrilling.   Our own images were reflected in the black shiny walls making me feel a part of the drama and wishing I were wearing a kimono.  



The display of gorgeous old Manchu robes were echoed by modern designed, absolutely fabulous costumes created by well known designers.  Mirrors were placed to perfectly show all the angles of the costumes and give the sensation of many versions of the scene incorporating the art with the movie. The mannequins all sported wonderful head pieces created specifically for this show by British milliner, Stephen Jones incorporating the 12 imperial symbols. Even many of the spectators had beautiful Asian, and South American faces whose high cheek bones flowing through the dark rooms along with us amplified the dream- like feel of the whole experience.



This combination of sensory input could be overwhelming, but for me it was just the right mix to crack the shell of everyday and leave me open to enjoy the beauty.  This is a tricky business.  I hope more museums incorporate this kind of theatre as tastefully as the Met has.  The whole show is curated by Andrew Bolton. Wong Kar Wai artistic director and Nathan Crowley production designer.



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          This was only one floor of the exhibit and there were two more. Here is a link that describes the others which were all quite wonderful.



     
We saw the John Singer Sargent show as well but I was not particularly interested in it, after the rich experience of the China show.  I do admire the way Sargent moves from rich darks to the light on the faces of his portraits making their features sing.

However, I did find fascinating the show Navigating the West, George Caleb Bingham and the River.  This is a show about his 40 year obsession.  Bingham painted many, many paintings of the same subject, basically men on a boat traveling down the Mississippi.  How he financed these paintings and what he chose to include and omit is very interesting.  There are sketches of the characters and an infra red study of one of the paintings showing how it evolved.

It was a very full day but well worth the trip.


See you next month.  Thanks for tuning in.

Best,
Nancy

Who did that?

Dear friends,
My computer sent out a blog from May just now with no help from me.  Sorry.
Best,
Nancy

Saturday, August 29, 2015

FLOWERS - Anthony Riley

A good friend and fine musician, Bob Loy, asked me if I would be interested in making a video of a song he recorded with Anthony Riley.  
Anthony's story is a sad one, chronicled here and in many other publications -http://articles.philly.com/2015-06-09/news/63189019_1_battle-round-best-street-performer-the-voice
Bob was in the middle of recording many of his own songs with Anthony when he died.  This is a lovely piece called Flowers.  This is not the official version.  It is an exclusive preview for you faithful followers.   After working with the music for a couple of weeks I find it very moving. Is it the back story, the lyrics, the tune, the voice?  Let me know what you think.

Here is the video -https://youtu.be/ahKFNHs2MOc

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Sheila Vaughn

Here is another blogger whose work I have come to really enjoy, Sheila Vaughn.  She is from England and when I first encountered her work she was painting landscapes of the countryside.  Recently she has been working on self portraits and paintings of people.  She never stops investigating new ideas and her paintings are fascinating.  Take a look at her latest.

http://artat.blogspot.com/2015/08/miracle.html

Thursday, August 6, 2015

other blogs #1

I am working on a large painting of my garden and one dog.  It will take a long time so I am going to be checking out other artist's blogs and sharing some interesting ones with you.
Here is my first choice.  Not necessarily top of my list - just the first one I came across when searching the internet with the words 'favorite artist blogs'.  I never saw this work before or read Jolie's blog before.   I just decided to dive in along with you into unknown territory.  I found her style engaging.  I hope you do too.  I will include blogs of friend's blogs and artists who I feel I know just from reading their blogs along with others I find for this exercise that are immediately appealing.

Let me know what you think.

Jolie Guillebeau



Monday, August 3, 2015

CROSSING


CROSSING
Nancy Herman
12" x 16"
oil on canvas board

I have often wondered if people living in the city are eventually turned into robots because they live in among the hard edges all day.  It is no wonder so many are able to deny climate change.  They are isolated from the climate except for stray moments between subway rides and taxi cabs.  Why should they believe nature could be the one to bring us down when it is so easily ignored in day to day living.

$750.00


Wednesday, July 22, 2015

8:30 Monday Morning


8:30 Monday Morning
Nancy Herman
6" x 8"
oil on canvas board

This guy, waiting for a ride with his lunch in his hand looks ready for the week ahead.  

$150.00

Monday, July 20, 2015

CAUGHT ON THE CORNER #2


CAUGHT ON THE CORNER #2
Nancy Herman
9" x 12"
oil on canvas board

Caught in the hard edges of today's world these two men find companionship on the corner.

$250.00



Thursday, July 16, 2015

FRIDAY FIVE O'CLOCK

The next in this series about people as part of the environment, caught as it were in the angles of the here and now.  The great rush at five to escape work and get home.


FRIDAY FIVE O'CLOCK
Nancy Herman
6" x 8"
oil on canvas board

$150.00



Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Caught on the Corner

While I try to find a way to make or find a kind of reverse stencil to create soft patterns in water color, I return to oil paint with a renewed appreciation of its properties.  Oh how thick and forgiving it is!

For a while I have been contemplating the way people are attached to their environment.  The time and place we live forms us in so many ways.  I have been dealing with this idea in each painting that includes people but have decided to push it a bit further.  Can I say this in a few simple shapes, carefully choosing the color to enhance the feeling of place and time?

Many times when cruising along the streets in Google maps I come across 2 or three men or women standing on a corner talking.  I always wonder what brought them there.  Here is the first in a series of paintings about that.  I have made the paint very thick, almost like lacquer.



CAUGHT ON THE CORNER
Nancy Herman
9" x 12"
oil on canvas board

$250.00